Journaling

An extremely useful part of the practice. As your movement practice gets more complex, so should your journaling technique. Here I will give you the basics of where to start when journaling and also how to advance this technique over time.

Journaling Basics

BE SPECIFIC. Do not write down, A1. or C2. Write down the name of the exercise, the tempo, the rest, the complexity/weight/technique you used, and any notes you have on that day.

BE CONSISTENT. Do not miss a day. If you forget your notebook (this happens to me from time to time), right when you get home write down everything you remember. If you are inconsistent it is more difficult to see progress and develop your practice over the long term.

NOTES. Write notes in your book on things to work on, things to try next session, things you liked , didn’t like, etc. etc. The more information you have (to a point) can drastically increase your movement practice.

DATE. Make sure to properly date each session. This is important when you go back to sessions over time. One, Five, Ten years from now you can see the exact date something was executed.

REVIEW. Look back to your notes on a daily basis. Before your next session, during the session, after the session. These all can help improve your sessions, remind you of certain areas to focus on and how to progress on that day.